Budget Criteria And Drug Value Assessments: A Case Of Apples And Oranges?

While the details of value measurement continue to be vigorously debated, nearly unprecedented consensus has emerged over the need to align reimbursement and utilization with value. More controversial, however, is the role of budgetary criteria in determining value and in governing access to health care technologies. The case for adding budgetary tests to measure value on top of traditional value assessments is problematic on several levels.

 

 
 
 
 
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Commentary 7/24/17

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Commentary 7/24/17

Rapid Biomedical Innovation Calls For Similar Innovation In Pricing And Value Measurement

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