Publications

We are leveraging evidence and influencing the national dialogue about value.

1-8 of 26 Publications

Journal of Clinical Oncology 2017

Relevance of American Society of Clinical Oncology Value Framework Will Be Improved if It Is Based on Network Meta-Analyses

In his letter to the editor, IVI's Jeroen Jansen makes the case in Journal of Clinical Oncology that network meta-analysis is the only transparent framework to help answer the treatment selection question.

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JAMA 2016

Utility of Cancer Value Frameworks for Patients, Payers, and Physicians

This viewpoint, authored by Dr. Chandra, Dr. Shafrin, and Dr. Dhawan, describes the differences between various cancer value frameworks and provides recommendations for improving them for clinicians, patients, and payers. In recent years, novel cancer therapies have improved the expected survival of patients but have also increased treatment costs. 

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JAMA 2016

The Past and Future of the Affordable Care Act

In this editorial, Drs. Skinner and Chandra respond to a letter published by Pres. Barack Obama assessing the success of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

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Health Affairs blog 2016

Rapid Biomedical Innovation Calls For Similar Innovation In Pricing And Value Measurement

To balance physician prescribing of state-of-the-art drugs and patient desires to access them with the fiscal realities of high treatment costs, many governments have turned to health technology assessment (HTA) bodies to identify “high value” treatments. The authors discuss the history of HTA in the US, the issues of conducting HTA in the US context, and the need for innovation in how value is measured and linked to reimbursement.

 

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Health Affairs Blog 2016

Does a 'One-Size-Fits-All' Formulary Policy Make Sense

Over the last decade, insurers have increasingly used step therapy or “fail-first,” policies as a strategy to contain pharmaceutical costs. Step therapy requires patients to begin treatment for a medical condition on a typically less expensive drug, and only progress to more costly second-line drugs when the first-line therapy becomes ineffective or inappropriate. 

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Health Affairs Blog 2016

Discovering New Medicines And New Ways To Pay For Them

While the rest of the health care system is moving toward paying for value, payments for drugs largely continue to be stuck in a 20th century construct that focuses on price, regardless of the health outcomes of each patient. This lack of payment innovation is particularly damaging in an era where on the horizon new treatments and cures promise great benefit for consumers, but also bring great upfront costs for individuals, employers, and governments at every level. This article proposes a new path forward.

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Health Affairs Blog 2016

Budget Criteria And Drug Value Assessments: A Case Of Apples And Oranges?

While the details of value measurement continue to be vigorously debated, nearly unprecedented consensus has emerged over the need to align reimbursement and utilization with value. More controversial, however, is the role of budgetary criteria in determining value and in governing access to health care technologies. The case for adding budgetary tests to measure value on top of traditional value assessments is problematic on several levels.

 

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Harvard Business Review 2015

Understanding Health Care's Short-Termism Problem

The meaning of "value" varies by each stakeholder and is thereore the least well understood. Drs. Chandra and Goldman discuss that the right way to think about value in health care delivery is a stream of benefiƒts accrued over a lifetime that is attractive relative to the price paid to acquire them. Using examples with schizophrenia, hepatitis c, and kidney cancer, a value-based design would avoid a "one-size-fits-all" view of drug coverage. Regardless, the challenge is to fiƒgure out how to create and develop policies to reward long-term benefits.

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